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Dylan Corlay

Conductor

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News

Dylan Corlay conducts “Hip Hop Symphonique” at Maison de Radio France

Dylan Corlay conducts “Hip Hop Symphonique” at Maison de Radio France

Conductor Dylan Corlay collaborates with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France and hip hop artists Dosseh, Sniper, Sofiane, S Pri Noi and Wallen for an exciting fusion of music genres in Paris The sold-out concert “Hip Hop Symphonique” will take place at the Maison de Radio France on Wednesday 31 October, and will be live-streamed ...

Dylan Corlay makes his début with the Berner Symphonieorchester

Dylan Corlay makes his début with the Berner Symphonieorchester

Dylan Corlay conducts a varied and colourful programme of works by Messiaen, Beethoven and Ravel at the Kursaal in Bern on 28 and 29 April The concerts open with Olivier Messiaen’s short but powerful religious triptych, Les Offrandes Oubliées, followed by a performance of Beethoven’s Triple Concerto, with the Oliver Schnyder Piano Trio The chorus of the Konzert Theater Bern ...

Biography

Unanimous winner of the 6th Jorma Panula International Conducting Competition in November 2015, Dylan Corlay is a dynamic, inspirational conductor, praised for the accuracy and depth of his interpretations.

From 2015-17 he was Assistant Conductor of Ensemble InterContemporain, in residence at the Philharmonie de Paris, under the artistic direction of Matthias Pintscher. Dylan Corlay made his début at Oper Frankfurt in March 2017, conducting Berlioz’s epic 5-act opera, Les Troyens, and he later worked on the much-acclaimed Warner recording of the opera as assistant conductor to John Nelson, with Michael Spyres, Joyce DiDonato and the Orchestre Philharmonique de Strasbourg.

Further highlights from the 2017/18 season include highly acclaimed performances with the Orchestre National de France, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Orchestre National de Lyon, Orchestre de Chambre de Paris, Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse, Orchestre National de l’Ile de France, Orchestre National des Pays de la Loire, Orchestre National de Lille, Orchestre Symphonique de Tours, Orchestre Lamoureux, Orchestre de Chambre Nouvelle-Aquitaine, the Joensuu City Orchestra, the Berner Symphonieorchester, as well as an extensive Netherlands tour with Ensemble InterContemporain. And in the 2018/19 season, Dylan Corlay makes his débuts with the Orchestre National de Lorraine, Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne, Sinfonietta de Lausanne and Orchestre Philharmonique de Luxembourg.

Born in Vitré, France, Dylan Corlay graduated from the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris with diplomas in orchestral conducting, bassoon, chamber music, harmony, improvisation, and teaching, winning numerous prizes. He also trained in trumpet, guitar, piano and ondes Martenot. Having furthered his bassoon studies with Marco Postingel at the Universität Mozarteum in Salzburg, he performed with many major French and European orchestras under the baton of such renowned conductors as Tugan Sokhiev, Philippe Jordan, Myung-Whun Chung and Pierre Boulez. Corlay was trained in conducting by Jean-Sébastien Béreau, Gianluigi Gelmetti, Jorma Panula, Atso Almila and Péter Eötvös.

A committed and passionate teacher and a natural communicator, Dylan Corlay has conducted the concert and symphony orchestras at the Conservatoire de Tours since September 2013, works regularly with the Démos project in Metz and has run courses in conducting and sound painting in France, Japan and Brazil. He also composes and arranges, winning the Best Film Music award at the International Festival of Short Films in Hamburg in June 2010 with one of his compositions.

Dylan Corlay has a wide repertoire, and has met with considerable success as a composer, director and performer of contemporary and multidisciplinary musical productions involving musicians, dancers, actors and artists, and has received equally enthusiastic reviews for his interpretations of the works of Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann and Debussy.

Reviews

It is impressive how Corlay uses dance-like, agile, body language to describe the movement of the music, to which the orchestra responds with no less remarkable precision and transparency.
- Das Kleine Bund
 (Stephan Bucher)
, 2018
What strength was unfurled again and again from these huge Berliozian orchestral forces, shaped by the young conductor, Dylan Corlay, and this outstanding orchestra, into a powerful sound. [Berlioz, Les Troyens]
- Bachtrack
 (Christoph Wurzel)
, 2017
His warm rapport with the musicians, his love of the stage and his sense of sharing bewitched the international jury.
- La Croix
 (Xavier Renard)
, 2016
Corlay proved himself to be a born interpreter of Schumann, with a performance that was both thoroughly analysed and emotionally charged. His tempi were exact, his rubato and phrasing gave the music a vital energy, and the whole work flowed beautifully. [Symphony No.3]
- Hufvudstadsbladet
 (Mats Liljeroos)
, 2016
From the opening bars, conductor Dylan Corlay, winner of last year's Jorma Panula International Conducting Competition, captured the essence of the work. [Mendelssohn, Die Heimkehr aus der Fremde]
- Hufvudstadsbladet
 (Mats Liljeroos)
, 2016
Currently assistant conductor at Ensemble intercontemporain, this bassoonist, who is also a composer and producer of musical theatre, will receive some attractive offers, but he has only one aim: to continue to learn! Talent does not exclude humility.
- Le Figaro
 (Christian Merlin)
, 2016
Whilst paying close attention to accuracy, he is extremely lively, which resulted a performance of Lindberg's Jubilees that was playful and energetic, rather than a mathematical exercise.
- Le Figaro
 (Christian Merlin)
, 2015
Dylan Corlay won the competition because he was able to make us forget that this was a competition. He was having fun, he was enjoying making music with others, in this case the members of the orchestra. And it was contagious. The musicians were infinitely more involved and captivated with him, even though he continued to make them rehearse until everything was in place. With his clear gestures he communicated his ideas perfectly, obtaining without words the French colour of the glittering notes of Debussy's La Mer, from an orchestra who had never played it.
- Le Figaro
 (Christian Merlin)
, 2015